Ethereal Paper Sculptures and Large-Scale Installations by Ayumi Shibata Play With Light and Shadow



Art

#installation #light #nature #paper #sculpture #shadows

February 18, 2022

Anna Marks

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showcasing a miniature urban landscape with large trees

All images © Ayumi Shibata, shared with permission

Japan-based artist Ayumi Shibata (previously) designs intricate landscapes using layers upon layers of white paper. Some of her sculptures are miniature, whereas others are immersive installations, and all are brought to life with the play of light and shadow, which create “movement” throughout her pieces. The works feature architectural domes, cave-like forests, and swirling suns hovering over tree-filled cities. These picturesque places aren’t based on a particular location but what the artist “hopes and believes the future of the planet could look like”.

Shibata’s ethereal landscapes envision a world in which humans and natural forms coexist, and she describes her pieces as having a “Yin and Yang” element. Paper represents Yin, the material, and the ways the works emit shadows correlates to Yang, the invisible world. “The light represents spirit and life, how the sun rises and breathes life into the world,” she explains. “I believe my pieces are a place to observe the material world and the visible one.”

The physical elements have a deeper meaning for the artist, as well: In Japanese, Kami means god or spirit but also paper, a sacred material in the Shinto religion. “Invisible ‘Kami’ spirits dwell in various objects and events, places, as well as in our houses and in our bodies,” she says. “I use my technique to express my thankfulness to the Kami spirits for having been born in this life. Each piece of paper I cut is a prayer.”

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

Shibata began constructing these sculptures when living in New York. She would visit a church to meditate and escape the noise of the city, and it was when she observed light illuminating stained glass that she was reminded of her love of working with paper. The artist explains:

The city was full of noise. Everything, people, time goes so fast and moves rapidly, and I needed a quiet space to go back to myself. One day, I opened my eyes after meditation and saw colorful light flooding the floor through the stained glass. It was breathtakingly beautiful. It reminded me of a memory from childhood where I used to cut black paper and stick colored cellophane behind it to make a ‘paper’ stained glass piece. I got the tools on my way home and tried it that night. From that moment, I continued to cut paper.

Currently, Shibata is working on an installation called “Inochino-uta, Poetry of Life,” for an exhibition later this year. The large-scale project is made out of 108 pieces of paper connected by strings and suspended from the ceiling. To view more of the artist’s work, visit her Instagram or website.

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showcasing a little boat sailing upon waves

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showcasing a little boat sailing upon waves

A close up photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showing dome-like architectural forms and tunnels

A close up photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showing dome-like architectural forms and tunnels

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showcasing a swirling sun hovering over a city with lots of trees

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures showcasing a swirling sun hovering over a city with lots of trees

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

A photograph of Ayumi Shibata's white paper sculptures

#installation #light #nature #paper #sculpture #shadows

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